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Phil
Clapham
NOAA Alaska Fisheries Science Center
Clapham.jpg

Dr. Phil Clapham is the leader of the Cetacean Assessment and Ecology Program at the National Marine Mammal Lab in Seattle. His work focuses on population biology, behavioral ecology and conservation management, with particular emphasis on large whales. He has studied cetaceans since 1980, and at one time or another has worked with most species of whales in various places worldwide.

Prior to his current position, he worked at the Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. He remains associated with the Smithsonian Institution (National Museum of Natural History) in Washington DC, and for many years directed a long-term study of individually identified humpback whales at the Center for Coastal Studies in Massachusetts.

Phil holds a PhD in zoology from the University of Aberdeen (Scotland), and has advised several governments and other bodies on whale research and conservation. Phil is a former member of the Board of Governors of the Society for Marine Mammalogy, and is a long-time member of the US delegation to the International Whaling Commission’s Scientific Committee. He is an editor for two scientific journals (Biology Letters and Mammal Review), and has published four books and more than a hundred peer-reviewed papers on whales and other cetaceans.