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Kathy
Kuletz
US Fish and Wildlife Service
Kuletz1.jpg

Dr. Kuletz received her BS in 1974 from California State Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, her MSc in 1983 from University of California, Irvine, and her PhD in 2005 from the University of Victoria, British Columbia.

Dr. Kuletz has spent 30 years studying seabird ecology in Alaska, most often focusing on seabird distribution and abundance. She has served as a PI for studies on seabird diet, productivity, habitat use, and population trends, as well as damage assessment from oil spills. Her first work in the Bering Sea was in 1980 as a seabird observer while a graduate student with Dr. George Hunt, Jr. Dr. Kuletz served on the North Pacific Fisheries Management Council Plan Team from 2000 to 2007, and is currently a member of the Science and Statistical Committee of the NPFMC.

Since 2006, Dr. Kuletz has led the North Pacific At-Sea Seabird Program, which places observers on research vessels to collect data on seabird distribution relative to oceanographic and biological variables. The ultimate goal is to determine how present conditions and future changes in Alaska's oceans will affect seabird life.