Generic selectors
Exact matches only
Search in title
Search in content
Post Type Selectors

Current
Biennial Report

What’s New
At NPRB?

Home

OUR PROGRAMS

Science Foundation

Core Program

Integrated Ecosystem Research

Northern Bering Sea

Arctic Program

Bering Sea Project

Gulf of Alaska Project

Long-Term Monitoring Program

Outreach Program

Graduate Student Research Awards

Project search

News & Events

Contact Us

About NPRB
  • Menu Item 1
  • Menu Item 2
  • Menu Item 3
  • Menu Item 4
  • Menu Item 5
  • Menu Item 6
  • Menu Item 7

Title Goes Here

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the

Title Goes Here

Your content goes here. Edit or remove this text inline or in the module Content settings. You can also style every aspect of this content in the module Design settings and even apply custom CSS to this text in the

David
Shull
Western Washington University
Shull3.jpg

David Shull is an associate professor in the Department of Environmental Sciences at Western Washington University. He received a bachelor's degree in oceanography from the University of Washington, a master's degree from the University of Connecticut, and a PhD from the University of Massachusetts Boston. His research focuses on organisms that inhabit the muddy seafloor (benthos) and their effects on the chemistry of sediments and overlying water.

He first became interested in benthic organisms while digging up various worms, clams, shrimp and other unusual creatures inhabiting mud flats exposed at low tide in front of his grandparent's home on Vashon Island in Puget Sound, Washington.

Although the vast majority of the earth's solid surface is covered in marine mud and benthic organisms thus inhabit the largest habitat on the earth's solid surface, there is much to be learned about the ecological and functional roles these bottom dwellers play in the ocean. David's work in the Bering Sea focuses on the effects of variation in organic-matter supply from the water column to the sediments on the abundance of benthic organisms and the rates of nutrient cycling between sediments and overlying water.