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Dan
Roby
Oregon State University
Roby2.jpg

Dan Roby is currently the Assistant Unit Leader (Wildlife) at the USGS Oregon Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit. He is also a Professor of Wildlife Ecology in the Department of Fisheries and Wildlife at Oregon State University.

He received a BA (Biology) from Antioch College in 1974, an MS (Wildlife Management) from the University of Alaska in 1978, and a PhD (Biology) from the University of Pennsylvania in 1986, where he worked under Professor Robert E. Ricklefs on the relationship of diet to reproductive energetics in seabirds.

In addition to his current position at OSU, he has held faculty positions at Southern Illinois University-Carbondale (Assistant Professor of Zoology, 1988-1992) and the University of Alaska Fairbanks (Assistant Professor of Wildlife Ecology, 1992-1995).

Dan has conducted research on the ecology of seabirds in Alaska, Hawaii, Greenland, Newfoundland, South Georgia, and Antarctica, as well as throughout the Pacific Northwest. His primary area of research interest is the physiological ecology and conservation biology of birds, with an emphasis on seabirds. His recent research includes impacts of avian predation on recovery of ESA-listed salmonids in the Columbia River Basin, bioenergetics of seabirds affected by the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska, development of biomarkers of exposure to contaminants in birds, seabird/fisheries interactions, and effects of global warming on seabird populations at high latitudes, especially the Bering Sea. He served as Chair of the Pacific Seabird Group during 2004-2006.