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Carolina
Parada
University of Washington
carolina.parada.veliz@gmail.com
CarolinaParada.jpg

Dr. Carolina Parada is contributing to the Exploring Groundfish Dynamics with Integrated Biophysical Models aspect of the Gulf of Alaska Project under contract to the University of Washington. Her work focuses on biophysical modeling and links to population dynamics and the environment, transport and connectivity of marine populations. She has been using biophysical models since 1999 and applying these models to study larval drift, connectivity and pre-recruitment variability for various pelagic and benthic species in different regions.  Carolina is developing the pollock individual-based model for this project.

Prior to her current position, Carolina worked as a research scientist at the Fishery Research Institute (INPESCA) at Talcahuano-Chile and was an associate researcher at the Geophysical Department at the University of Concepcion-Chile.  Prior to that, she completed a postdoc at the Alaska Fisheries Science Center in Seattle, and University of Washington. Her main research was focused on studying larval transport and connectivity between spawning and nursery areas for pollock in the Gulf of Alaska, snow crab in the Bering Sea and green crab invasive potential in the California system. Carolina holds a PhD in Oceanography from the University of Cape Town (SouthAfrica).