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by Jeanette Gann, Chief Scientist aboard the Northwest Explorer
8/2/2013


beautiful day spent heading north to our first station. Below the bird observer John Warzybok checking out the birds and scenery as we head into Cross Sound.

Dogfish
8/3/2013

Our first day of sampling went smoothly with the last catch of the day yielding more than 780 spiny dogfish.  Scientists worked quickly to count and release the fish, as they are not a primary target species for this survey. A few individuals were held for weights and lengths. Spiny Dogfish are found in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans in both northern and southern hemispheres, getting their name from spines found on their dorsal fins.  They are a highly migratory species that school with individuals of the same size class as they grow (www.flmnh.ufl.edu/fish/gallery/descript/spinydogfish/spinydogfish.html) 

http://www.nprb.org/assets/images/uploads/blog/John+Warzybok.jpg